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President Mnangagwa fires Prisca Mupfumira

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Prisca Mupfumira fired

President Emmerson Mnangagwa fired Tourism Minister Prisca Mupfumira on Thursday, a statement from Zimbabwe’s presidency said, after she was detained over the disappearance of millions of dollars during her time as welfare minister.

Prisca Mupfumira is facing seven corruption charges linked to $94 million missing from the country’s pension fund.

She was “removed … from the office of a cabinet minister and minister of government with immediate effect”, the statement said, without giving further details.

Mupfumira was arrested by the Zimbabwe Anti-Corruption Commission in July, becoming the first sitting minister of the ruling Zanu-PF party to be jailed for graft under Mnangagwa’s new administration.

Mupfumira was sacked as social welfare minister by ex-president Robert Mugabe weeks before a military-led coup that toppled the long-time ruler in November 2017.

After the putsch, she was re-appointed with a new portfolio.

Mnangagwa has identified endemic corruption as a major contributor to the country’s economic woes and vowed to root it out.AFP

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BUSINESS

Eskom Begins 400MW Power Supply to Zimbabwe

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Fortune Chasi

ZESA Holdings has reportedly started receiving 400 Megawatts of electricity from South Africa power utility, ESKOM.

This comes after the latter accepted Zimbabwe’s payment plan which involves payment of US$890,000 per week to settle its long-standing debt with ESKOM.

Zimbabwe is currently generating about 692 megawatts against a daily peak demand of about 1 600MW to 2000MW in winter.
All sectors were projecting fewer revenues this year as a result of the crippling load-shedding which ZESA had implemented due to the power deficit in the country.

Some companies were contemplating closing some of their branches with OK Zimbabwe, one of the biggest retailers in the country, having already closed one of its shops in Rusape.

The main power generator in the country, Kariba South Hydropower plant, has reportedly been immensely affected by the shrinking water levels at the dam whilst Hwange thermal power is underperforming due to ageing equipment.

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More than 2 million Zimbabweans on the brink of starvation – UN

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Zimbabwe Food Crisis

More than two million Zimbabweans are on the cusp of “starvation”, the United Nations food agency has said, launching a $331.5m aid appeal to help the southern African country recover from a devastating drought.

David Beasley, executive director of the World Food Programme (WFP), said on Tuesday that 2.3 million people in rural Zimbabwe were in “crisis emergency mode” and need food aid now.

“We are talking about people who truly are marching towards starvation if we are not here to help them,” Beasley said. “We are facing a drought unlike any that we have seen in a long time.”

The El Nino-induced drought cut the maize harvest by half, and President Emmerson Mnangagwa has declared it a national disaster.

The drought comes with Zimbabweans enduring the worst economic crisis in a decade – prices of staples such as sugar, cooking oil and rice have more than doubled since June, jacking up inflation to more than 175%.

Beasley said those in need of emergency food aid in rural Zimbabwe would increase to 5.5 million by next year.

The government estimates another 2.2 million people in urban areas also require food aid, bringing the total to 7.7 million, more than half of the country’s population.

The $331.5m would be used for food aid, provision of water and sanitation and cash handouts to stricken families.

In addition to food shortages, the appeal also targeted the humanitarian needs of victims of Cyclone Idai which tore through parts of eastern Zimbabwe earlier this year.

The cyclone, which also affected parts of Malawi and Mozambique, affected 570 000 Zimbabweans and displaced some 50 000 of them.

Mnangagwa, in a tweet on Wednesday, called for urgent action from the international community to help Zimbabwe deal with “the devastating Cyclone Idai and an El Nino induced drought”.

Emmerson Mnangagwa took over from longtime leader, Robert Mugabe, following a military coup in November 2017.

He won disputed elections last year, pledging to revive the struggling economy, create jobs, attract foreign investment and turn the country into a middle-income economy by 2030. But he has struggled to deliver on economic promises or usher in meaningful political reforms.

Zimbabwe is also experiencing its worst power cuts in three years, partly because the drought has reduced water levels at the country’s biggest hydro plant, Kariba.

Amid rising discontent, the main opposition party said it was planning street demonstrations next week to protest against the government’s handling of the economy.

Al Jazeera

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Zimbabwe runs out of passports, adding to a long list of shortages

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Zimbabwe passports shortage

Zimbabwe has run out of passports and vehicle registration number plates, forcing citizens to wait for long periods to get them – yet another sign of a desperate shortage of U.S. dollars in the southern African nation.

A hoped-for economic turnaround under President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who took over from Robert Mugabe after a 2017 coup, is yet to materialize. Instead, Zimbabweans are enduring shortages of U.S. dollars, fuel, bread and 15-hour power cuts.

Last week, the government renamed its interim currency, the RTGS dollar, the Zimbabwe dollar and made it the country’s sole legal tender. That ended a decade of dollarization and took another step toward relaunching a fully-fledged currency.

At the passport office in Harare early on Wednesday, hundreds of people huddled in the morning winter cold after arriving as early as 5 a.m. (0300 GMT) to queue to apply for passports. They were told to check their documents in 2022.

That is because a special paper and ink used to make passports has to be imported but there is no foreign currency.

Bothwell Mhashu, one of those queueing, said he wanted to escape the economic troubles at home and join his elder brother in Namibia. He applied for a passport in June 2018 and was supposed to get his document after three months.

“They just told me that my passport is not ready, I have to check again in August. This is not fair,” a despondent Mhashu said as he left the passport office.
Transport Minister Joel Matiza said he could not immediately comment.

Soaring inflation and shortages are reminding Zimbabweans of the dark days under Mugabe, but Mnangagwa’s government says this is the pain of reform that will ultimately revive the economy. Reuters

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